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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the religion. >> this is amazing. >> grant practices his religion in chicago. at a chain of local restaurants he owns after a late cubs broadcaster harry carey. they're part eatery part shrine, to the most sacred moments of chicago sports. >> i nirng you went back to the last ten years or so no one's gone after more chicago related memorabilia than me. >> in this year he took it to an entirely new level after the chicago blackhawks won the stanley cup. >> i was trying to look around. what would be something that would be symbolized. when andrew shaw got injured during game six, he almost got knocked out. the puck hit him in the face blood everywhere. >> center for the team. >> won't out. but he's such ta tough time he came back and play and had a miraculous rinne. >> in the report err's way there was no better way to memorialize the that win than to pay $65,000 for the stitches used to close the cut on his face. >> did you calculate this at all, that i'm about to buy stitches from a hockey player? >> just a little bit. >> just a little bit? >> a lot of p
no country from morocco to pakistan in which christians can freely practice their religion, end of quote. he continued, quote, there is a severe danger as we start to celebrate the feast of christmas in this country that all christianity will be almost completely erased from the traditional middle east holy land of the bible. mary to uld not take egypt because jesus would not have been safe there today. to follow on sir baldry's line of thinking, the patriarch abraham would also have a difficult time surviving in iraq having come from er, which is now nasiriyah. jonah would be hard pressed to make it to naviniva, which is now in the most you will area, and paul could scarcely travel the road to demascus in syria. the debate in the house of commons began with a staggering statistic, namely that one christian is killed every 11 minutes somewhere on earth for their faith. one christian is killed every 11 minutes somewhere on earth for their faith. the focus of the commons debate was on the persecution of christians, several noted that whether or not you are a person of faith, all should be conc
them an opportunity to intrude on religion, and what is to stoop them -- stop them from saying you have to cover abortion. that's why notre dame filed the lawsuit. >> are there students at notre dame that disagree with the lawsuit and think they ought to provide contraception? >> of course. of course. i've engaged other students and they're -- what they're saying is this is a matter of a woman's access to contraceptive coverage. one person engaged me and said contraception costs a lot of money. $200, and workers at notre dame don't make a lot of money so the university should cover it. but what we have to remember is that this isn't about a woman's access to contraception. this is about religious liberty, and notre dame maintaining its integrity. and not being compromised by the federal government. >> i think it's important to realize, when people say they're restricting access. they're not restricting access. they're determining who pays for it. >> exactly. >> i can go to a movie theater -- i have access to go, but i got to buy my own ticket. it's like if i want to see this movie in th
and there are ramifications for politics and religion in europe. across europe, people think this printing press is bad news and we need to find a way to control it. they say you cannot own a printer press unless you have a license from the government and all documents have to be checked. but this system fails to work immediately. they are ways of getting around the licensing requirements. when given a license, you can write under license on a document and list a different pripter -- printer or make one up -- it is hard for the authorities to figure out who printed the document and you get a fight from the de-centralized nature of the environment and the desire to control it by government. we recognize this from the 1500s and now. >> tom standage is here with us and he is the author of "writing on the wall" what is your day job? >> i am a digital editor at the economist and part of that led to my interest in historical media. we have returning to the way things used to work. and the economist came out of culture of clubs and coffee shops and discussions. there is a lot we can learn from looking at the histo
interpretation of religions. we already had the first world trade center bombing in 1993, remember, and the people hurt in bosnia were muslims. it was a source of concern to people all across the word. i received calls from both the pope and the king of saudi arabia asking me to intervene in bosnia. i wondered where that was the first time they had been on the same side of an issue. dick holbrook said it was the problem from hell. when we discussed how everything happens at once, the aftermath of somalia, highty, bosnia, tony crack the one of the best lines of all in the white house. he said, you know, sometimes i really miss the cold war. [laughter] bosbosnia in some ways was a struggle for the 21st century. it was the first conflict which reminded us that the end of the cold war basically took the vail off this image we were privileged to have, even when it did not share with reality that there was a bipolar world and as dangerous as it was, at least it was organized. even our spies helped each other out, i used to say, you know, if the russians were better off if the spies in th
on on the kron 4 news spread a renewed a lawsuit tackle's religion and obama care, just as the president kicks off a three week media blitz touring and the benefits of the affordable care act. we will tell you where the legal battle is going. >> the richmond city council voted last night on day ordnance that could ban the use of the cigarettes in richmond. coming up we will tell you just how much and by later would have to pay if they're caught smoking in certain areas. >> paul walker and his friend, roger rodas autopsies are said to be released today. we will tell you what the corner had to use in order to identify the bodies. >> welcome back. obamacare faces another legal battle as the white house starts a three-week public relations campaign to re-market the affordable care act. andrew spencer reports some institutions want to make sure the health care reforms don't infringe on their religious freedoms. >> even though contraceptives are part of the guilt, their art read the filing this lawsuit after three weeks the obama administration is trying to encourage more people to sign up. this was
ramifications for politics and religion in europe. rulers across europe think, oh, dear, this printing press is bad news. we need to find a way to control this, so they start imposing these controls on the press. they say you can't own a printing press unless you have a license from the government, all documents have to be checked before they can be printed. but with almost immediately this system fails to work. there are ways of getting round the licensing requirements. you can do things like when you're given a license to print be something, you know, up to say under license on -- you can just write under license on a document anyway. you can list a completely different printer from the one who actually printed it or maybe make one up. you can print under a pseudonym, and it's very hard for the authorities to figure out who has printed this document and to go and punish them. so you get this fight between the decentralized nature of the media environment and the desire to centralize and control it by governments which we recognize as a phenomenon be of the internet era, but it's actually g
and safeguards the freedoms of speech, press, and religion. as the u.s. attempted to encourage ashe nations to develop a transparent society they need to look no further than their democratic neighbor. i want to pause right there and again yield to my friend as we continue this conversation and move forward on why this matters and bringing up these ideas of a relationship that's deeply rooted in history and of mutual sharing and not one going seemingly behind the back of the other. mr. schneider: you talk about the relationship. as you noted, harry s. trow truman was the first -- harry s. truman was the first to recognize the state of israel after the british left. immediately upon its declaration of independence, israel was attacked by five nations. throughout its history, israel has faced hostility from its neighbors throughout the region. since 1973 in the yom kippur war, as a 12-year-old boy, i remember vividly coming out of synagogue that day, sitting in the back seat of my parents' car, listening to the radio, not knowing if israel was going to survive. it was an intiss ten rble threa
of the parliamentarians, they religion against their to actually have a nuclear weapon. it's not like there hasn't been a debate within iran itself in regards to nuclear weapons program. it's not like all of iranians have said they want to move forward with nuclear weapons. they have been divided with their own society. they have that constant debate themselves. i think the iranian people made a choice when they decided to elect a more moderate president this time than they had previously. and so part of the voices of the tonian people are starting stare up also. they want to -- my hope is, and we will see whether or not they abide by the agreement and move forward, but my hope is that they would want to be a part of the international community. they cannot be part of the international community if in fact they have a nuclear weapon. as i said, it is important that russia and china has a stake in is also because here are individual countries who previously had not had a stake in this. important for them to have this p5+1 come together. if iran really wants to get back to the international committee, th
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)